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December 15, 2011. Nunatsiaq News. By Sarah Rogers.

Overcrowded housing across the Inuit Nunangat is one of the biggest barriers to Inuit health and well-being, says a new report. Released Dec. 14, the report If Not Now - When? Addressing the Ongoing Inuit Housing Crisis in Canada was produced by Inuit Tuttarvingat of the National Aboriginal Health Organization. The report identifies the most critical outcome of the housing crisis that plagues so many Inuit communities across the country: its long-term effect on today's young Inuit. The overcrowded housing will hinder their future participation in the North, the report says. The 70-page report cites 2006 statistics which show that 31 per cent of Inuit live in crowded housing, compared to three per cent of Canada's total population. But it also acknowledges that a housing crisis is hardly new, noting that adequate housing for Inuit communities has been a persistent concern since the creation of permanent communities in the Canadian Arctic 60 years ago. "Housing has been inadequate since Inuit began settling into permanent communities in the 1950s," said Cathleen Knotsch, a senior researcher and author of the study. "The crisis is growing to the extent that many children will live their entire childhood in overcrowded houses that might have three, four or five generations living in a two or three bedroom house."

Read more at: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674overcrowded_housing_crippling_the_norths_future_report/

Posted by Kiri Staples – 12/16/11; 8:24:58 AM – Permalink –   –

December 16, 2011. Nunatsiaq News. By Jane George.

When more than 100 staff and board members of Clyde River's Ilisaqsivik Society, along with their families, held their Christmas party Dec. 15, they had much to be grateful for: the cash-poor community's wellness centre had made it through another year. And earlier this month Ilisaqsivik received some unexpected recognition, when Tides Canada, the country's largest public foundation dedicated to the environment and social justice, listed the centre among its "Top 10 recipients for 2011." The Tides Top 10 recognizes Canada's "most innovative and forward-thinking projects and organizations that have demonstrated outstanding leadership, vision and real-world impact in addressing today's most pressing environmental and social problems." That honour didn't come with any money attached " but it's intended to generate interest for Ilisaqsivik among potential donors and supporters, and it may open new doors to funding from foundations who will now "know we exist," said Jakob Gearheard, Ilisaqsivik's executive director. Meanwhile, Ilisaqsivik is struggling. Ilisaqsivik, whose programs include health and wellness programs for mothers and children, literacy programs, access to computers and counseling, while supporting a men's healing group, women's sewing circle, an elders' group, youth council and Sukkakut, a group for women, remains in difficult financial straits, Gearheard said...

Read more at: http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674ilisaqsivik_nets_recognition_but_not_enough_money/


Posted by Kiri Staples – 12/16/11; 8:17:40 AM – Permalink –   –

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