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iPolitics Insight  Wed, Feb 29, 2012, 5:01 am by Don Lenihan
The Makimaniq Plan: A Shared Approach to Poverty Reduction is the result of a remarkable, year-long process that engaged some 800 of Nunavut’s 33,000 people, across the territory. In Monday’s column, we saw how, for Inuit, poverty reduction requires healing through empowerment.

The Makimaniq Plan recognizes that this, in turn, requires real community engagement. It is at the community level that individuals and families are most likely to mobilize in ways that will begin to rebuild self-reliance and a sense of ownership of the issues.

The Plan calls for the creation of a new kind of collaborative organization to lead community engagement: the Nunavut Roundtable on Poverty Reduction. Members will include the Government of Nunavut, Nunavut Tunngavik Inc. (NTI) — the official steward of Inuit interests in the territory — communities, community organizations and businesses.

If this doesn’t sound especially innovative, here is the show-stopper: Premier Eva Aariak has promised that “this Government will introduce legislation for the implementation of the long-term Poverty Reduction Action Plan with the collaboration of our partners.” (my emphasis)

In other words, the legislation appears to aim at ensuring government’s participation in the Roundtable will be as a full and genuine partner.

read full article at http://www.ipolitics.ca/2012/02/29/don-lenihan-making-democracy-work-could-nunavut-take-the-lead/

Posted by Valoree Walker – 3/1/12; 9:19:01 AM – Permalink –   –

iPolitics Insight Mon, Feb 27, 2012, 5:02 am by Don Lenihan  

…Inuit have the right…to participate in the development of social and cultural policies, and in the design of social and cultural programs and services, including their method of delivery, within the Nunavut Settlement Area. So the promise was that Inuit could have “Inuit government within a public government.” A decade later, however, many Inuit feel this promise is unfulfilled.

In 2009, a major review of the government’s performance surveyed 2,100 people from 25 communities and found that:
Often people described governance in Nunavut as a vision not yet realized and, at times, a vision derailed. Without doubt, the expectations most people had of Nunavut at its inception have not yet been met.
Premier Eva Aariak has staked her government’s credibility on turning this around. A major step was the Poverty Reduction Process, a year-long initiative that directly engaged some 800 people in 22 communities across the territory.
This was much more than a government “consultation.” It engaged communities in a searching discussion of how poverty is affecting their families, friends, neighborhoods and workplaces, and how they can work together to solve this.
....Today, poverty and powerlessness are a permanent presence for many Inuit. If the participants were clear that self-respect, self-reliance and community participation are critical conditions of well-being, they were equally clear that healing is connected to a sense of empowerment.
But many Inuit do not feel empowered. On the contrary, they feel trapped in their own land, their communities, even their homes.In practice, this means real action on housing, food security, education and economic development must do more than alleviate these needs. It must do so in a way that addresses the more fundamental question of dependence by promoting empowerment. It must lead to healing.
see full article at http://www.ipolitics.ca/2012/02/27/don-lenihan-memo-to-the-prime-minister-overcoming-poverty-in-nunavut/

Posted by Valoree Walker – 3/1/12; 9:10:38 AM – Permalink –   –

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