Theme 3: The State and the Northern Social Economy

Theme 3 Coordinator - Frances Abele, School of Public Policy and Administration, Carleton University (Project Lead)

For further information about this project, contact Frances Abele: frances_abele@carleton.ca

PowerPoint Presentation: The State and the Northern Social Economy
by Dr. Frances Abele

 

Project #

Project Title

Status

Project 3a

History of Policy Initiatives
Senada Delic, Tim O'Loan, Sheena Kennedy, Joshua Gladstone, and Frances Abele, Carleton University

Ongoing

Project 3b

Survey of Available Statistical Information Pertinent to Understanding the Northern Social Economy
Senada Delic and Frances Abele, Carleton University

Project Completed

Project 3c

A Green Housing Development in Iqaluit - Social Economy Interaction with City, Territorial and Federal Governments Jerald Sabin and Frances Abele, Carleton University

Project Completed

Project 3d

Building Empirically-Based Economic Models in the Arctic: A Look at Igloolik, NU 
Sheena Kennedy and Frances Abele, Carleton University

Project Completed

Project 3e

The Role of Co-operative Enterprise in the Social Economy of Repulse Bay, Nunavut  Jennifer Alsop and Frances Abele, Carleton University

Project Completed

Project 3f

Evolution of the Social Economy in Yellowknife
Jerald Sabin and Dr. Frances Abele, Carleton University

Project Completed

Project 3g

Housing and Being Homeless in Yellowknife  Nicholas Falvo and Dr. Frances Abele, Carleton University and Arlene Hache, Centre for Northern Families

Project Completed

Project 3h

  Housing as a Dimension of Poverty in the Yukon  Nicholas Falvo and Frances Abele, Carleton University and Bill Thomas, Yukon Anti-Poverty Coalition

Project Completed

 

Description

The State and the Northern Social Economy theme will consist of a long term project to be undertaken and will include a number of subprojects that will be approved as developed through the Scientific Review Committee of SERNNoCa. This will involve coordination with the other research themes and include collaboration with the theme coordinators, node coordinators and community researchers.  The geographical reach of the research will involve include the three northern territories, Labrador and Nunavik. This research will focus on conducting research that examines the relationship of the State, including governance structures and policies and the changes in the North that have influenced the development of the northern social economy and social enterprises and related organizations.  The research will provide an understanding of the evolution of state northern development policies since Confederation in the overall context of Canadian state formation and changes in the economy and provide the framework for the interpretation of the origins, particular characteristics and specific dynamics of the social economy in northern Canada. The research will examine some of the key differences and experiences unique to northern governance and the evolving economy.


There are two areas that will be examined initially to provide the necessary insights and analytical framework for interpretation of the origins, particular characteristics and specific dynamics of the northern social economy.  First, research will be conducted to provide an understanding of the evolution of state northern development policies since Confederation in the overall context of Canadian state formation and changes in the world economy.  Second, will be to interpret and assess the impact of these changes upon the traditional, domestic or mixed economy as it has evolved over the same period. 

 The term 'social economy' is a modern concept, appropriate to industrial capitalism. Capitalist economies have a unique feature  ' the conceptual and experiential separation of  'economic', 'political', 'religious', 'private' and other spheres of human activity. All known non-capitalist economies do not have this separation: kin relations often order economic and political arrangements, for example, and there is usually no 'state structure' that is separate from daily life (although of course there is leadership, division of labour, authority, hierarchy and so on). Clearly the term social economy was coined to refer to an aspect of modern capitalist economies  the part of economic and social life that is not directly part of the state, part of the private (corporate) sector, or part of the family (strictly personal or private).1

In the north, of course, capitalism coexists with a strong and much older economy, the gathering and hunting economy based on the land.  This traditional economy has adapted to various exogenous forces and opportunities and in turn it has nourished a distinctive northern approach to political, social and community development.

A student is in her first year of a doctoral program, is working towards a PhD in Public Policy at Carleton University.  The research work involves the compilation and analysis of statistical data on the northern mixed economy.  Further work will be to complete a chronology of northern policy initiatives (federal and territorial governments) related to economic development, beginning in the 1930's.  In addition, a second student has begun a preliminary assessment of oral history data bases in the five regions under study.


 

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